Well, I obviously think so. Otherwise I wouldn’t be doing this. Being a teacher has definitely honed my proofreading skills. As I stated on the main page of this site, I can’t turn it off. I continually correct English when out in public or when watching content with English subtitles.

Though not a direct lateral move, many of the skills involved in teaching writing to students are transferable to copywriting. The more I study about copywriting, the more I think to myself, “This is very similar to what I taught.” I know this stuff. I’m just learning to put a different spin on it and apply this knowledge in a slightly different way.

Now, back to our regularly scheduled program…

If you read my last post, you now know the different steps involved in the writing process. If you haven’t read my last post, what’s stopping you? Go do it. Now. Don’t worry, I’ll wait.

We all good? Great. As a quick refresher for those ‘bad students’ that didn’t go back and read my previous post:

An infographic outlining the writing process (writing, editing, copyediting, and proofreading)
Very Basic Outline of the Writing Process

Now I know what to do—you just made yourself obsolete

Did I? Maybe. What’s stopping you from learning all about copywriting? You’re smart. You can use a spell checker. Google will tell you everything you need to know about grammar. You’re all set. You can do all these things, but will you? More importantly, do you have the time to learn all these skills?

If you’re like most small business owners, there aren’t enough hours in the day. You bounce from task to task, ticking off items on a never-ending to-do list. Brainstorming, writing, re-writing, re-writing some more, scrapping it all and starting over. Moving phrases around, finding the right heading. Consulting a thesaurus for the right, appropriate, optimal, perfect, ideal word. Checking, double-checking, triple-checking. Uncovering missing commas and extra spaces. That’s my job. And it takes time. More time than you’d think, if you want it done well.

You don’t need these services just because English isn’t your first language

Native English speakers need these services. Non-native English speakers wanting to appear competent and professional really need these services. Native English speakers are more familiar with the language than non-native English speakers. Yet native English speakers still employ copywriters and proofreaders.

Doesn’t it make sense that a non-native speaker would struggle to write as fluently as a practiced copywriter? Or that they wouldn’t spot many of the errors a professional proofreader would? Is it possible a direct translation of one of your keywords isn’t the most natural way of saying it in English?

Choosing a copywriter or proofreader doesn’t mean your English ability is inadequate or inferior. It means you want to look professional and care enough to do things properly.

How can you do all the jobs usually done by specialized teams?

At large firms, specialized teams fill these individual roles. As a small business owner, you likely can’t afford those agencies. I’m attempting to fill that gap between doing it on your own and breaking the bank to hire a professional agency.

Fees for these services vary widely. Estimates range anywhere from $25–$25,000 per page. Yes, you read that correctly, $25,000 for one page. Of course, the upper end is rare, but it’s not uncommon for an agency to charge several thousand dollars for a landing page. My rates are at the lower end of the range.

I create unique quotes for every project after considering what you need done. Steps at the beginning of the writing process are more expensive while the final steps are cheaper. I also have to consider research time, length, and time frame. After assessing all these factors, I’ll offer you the most affordable proposal I can.

A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one

I’ve been a teacher for 25 years. I’ve been spotting and correcting errors in student writing for a quarter of a century. I’ve also been teaching students how to express themselves in writing. It’s been my job to help students find their own voices. As a copywriter or content writer, that’s what I bring to the table. My job is to represent your brand with your voice. My style may color the writing a bit, but if it doesn’t sound like you, it won’t convince your customers.

A picture of a small chalkboard that contains several typos and spelling mistakes, indicating that proofreading is tricky
If the 3 mistakes above didn’t jump out at you, you need my help

Along with all those years of teaching, I’ve also been proofreading subtitles for over 15 years. In that role, it’s my job to not only catch typos, but also to ensure that the subtitles flow and feel natural. Though tricky to proofread your own writing, with practice, it is possible.

When I’m a hugely successful copywriter and can afford it, I’ll definitely hire a proofreader. But for now, I’ll have to take the extra time and care needed to proofread my own work. My years as a proofreader have helped me hone techniques that I use on my own writing. Hell, I check my text messages for typos before pressing send.

Will I deliver you an award-winning landing page? Possibly…but probably not

Let’s face it—we’re both small business owners. You can’t compete with Amazon, and I can’t compete with multi-million dollar advertising agencies. But I can improve your website. Take a look at my portfolio to see for yourself.

If you think I could be of help to you, take the first step and get in touch. There’s no commitment, no consultation fee, and I promise I won’t bite. The worst that can happen is that you won’t like my offer. But what if you do? What if I significantly improve your site? What if that leads to an increase in sales?

As I used to say to my students, “It’s my job to help you, but you need to take the first step by asking for help.” Take that first step and contact me for a quote now.

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